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Kids Know It All Blog
  • Reading on a Dodo at Evelyn Meador Branch LibraryWe know, parents, we know. It seems like every time you turn around there's another talking head telling you that your child needs to do this and do that, or else...well...the talking head shudders to think of the dire consequences for your kid's future. Of course, this all plays on your natural fears, and of course, you would do anything to help little Joe or Jolene grow up to be a happy, successful adult, so you play Mozart around the clock even though both you and your child would rather listen to something just a little more funky, you flash flashcards at the breakfast table, you tilt the foot of the bed up 3 degrees so that the blood circulating through that precious little body bathes the pituitary gland. The end result? You're exhausted, your kid is bewildered, and a new talking head is lurking inside the TV waiting to pounce the next time you turn it on.

  • There was another sad loss to the children's book world today when we learned the news that Jean Craighead George had passed away at 92 years of age.  She had an amazing career, publishing over 100 books, winning the Newbery award for Julie of the Wolves and the Newbery honor for My Side of the Mountain, and inspiring generations of children.  She will be dearly missed.  School Library Journal has posted an obituary worth reading here.  If you would like to remind yourself what made her so special, or to discover her work for the first time, check our catalog here.

  • wild thingsOn Tuesday, May 8, Maurice Sendak, beloved children’s author and illustrator passed away at the age of 83. Although Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak’s most beloved book, was never a favorite of mine as a child (I preferred the rhyming stylings of Dr. Seuss and the collage art of Eric Carle), I do have fond memories of Max and the wild things. I’m sure most of us can probably recall a favorite book or character from either our own childhood or from reading out loud to a child.

    Picture books are an integral part of childhood. They introduce concepts and themes, visually stimulate the eye, and invite interaction between adult and child. It is not surprising that many of them have been the inspiration for films. A number of these picture books, like Mo Willems’ Knuffle Bunny and Don Freeman’s Corduroy, have been made into short films released through Scholastic Storybook Treasures and similar companies. Some, however, have been given the red carpet treatment and released in theaters. Either way, there is something magical about seeing a beloved picture book re-imagined on screen.